Behavioral Operation Research Brown Bag Seminar Series (BORB2S2)

This seminar series was created to foster collaboration, strengthen BOR community, raise interest for BOR topics, increase the visibility of BOR, and fast delivery of new ideas.

The seminars are scheduled for 40 min. The generic timetable suggests a brief introduction (5 min), a contribution (20 min), and a discussion (15 min). However, there is flexibility concerning the length of the contributions. In addition, there is an opportunity for interested in staying in the room to continue discussions.

The seminar takes place during “Brownbag-time for Europeans”

12 AM to 12.40 PM (UK GMT-1)

1 PM; to 1.40 PM (CET, Berlin)

It is scheduled bi-monthly every 2nd Thursday every second month under consideration of other workshops, conferences, etc. The next dates are the following:

April 14th 2022, June 9th 2022, August 11th 2022, October 13th, December 8th 2022 …

Different types of contributions are possible: Conference talks – work in progress, Mini-panel discussions with pre-assigned panelists, Open discussion with initial input of one contributor, Editors of journals discussing publishing BOR papers, Find collaborator – e.g., Ph.D. students present their work and look for a collaborator they could benefit from

Please reserve your BORB2S2 presentation date! Only an abstract of the talk is needed. Topics can cover any facets of BOR. Self-promotions are highly welcome. You can also suggest other speakers. Send all enquiries to Johannes Siebert (Johannes.Siebert (at) mci.edu)


  • BOR B2S2 V: Confidence in negotiation processes – From analytical models to recommendations

    Rudolf Vetschera (presenting author), University of Vienna (based on joint work with Luis Dias, Coimbra and Pascale Zaraté, Toulouse)

    Abstract:

    Existing (game theoretic) models of bargaining do not capture the typical dynamics of negotiation processes. Axiomatic models typically only provide characteristics of (desirable) bargaining outcomes, but do not specify a path on which these outcomes can be reached. Strategic models assuming perfectly rational players lead to the prediction that one player will start the process by proposing the equilibrium outcome, which will immediately be accepted by the other player. For a more realistic model of the bargaining process, we therefore need to develop models that take into account that payers are not able to immediately calculate equilibrium solutions or to predict the effects of bargaining steps they make. We present an analytical model based on this framework which emphasizes the role of expectations about the eventual outcome. We then provide empirical evidence on the validity of this model in the context of electronic negotiation experiments and show how the model could be used to provide recommendations to negotiators about their behavior.

    Why should you join?

    Everybody negotiates!

    June 9th, 2022,

    12 AM to 12.40 PM (UK GMT-1)

    1 PM; to 1.40 PM (CET, Berlin)

    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89595795858?pwd=djNyanVPOWphZkZLL0NWZ1pHNkRzQT09

    Meeting-ID: 895 9579 5858

    Code: 507724


  • BOR B2S2 IV: Modelling fairness in supply chains, April 14th, 12 AM to 12.40 PM (UK GMT-1)

    Andreas Größler (presenting author), (Institute of Business Administration, Operations Management Department, University of Stuttgart)

    Ivan Dula, (Institute of Business Administration, Operations Management Department, University of Stuttgart)

    April 14th, 2022

    12 AM to 12.40 PM (UK GMT-1)

    1 PM; to 1.40 PM (CET, Berlin)

    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89595795858?pwd=djNyanVPOWphZkZLL0NWZ1pHNkRzQT09

    Meeting-ID: 895 9579 5858

    Code: 507724

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this presentation is to explain, how dynamic models of inequity aversion and fairness can be developed for dynamically complex supply chains. Based on the differences between the conceptualizations of individual models and differences between subsequent simulation results, we discuss implications of fairness for decision-makers in supply chains. We find that, if supply chain members have social preferences, such as fairness concerns, they will experience a reduction in their utilities. Depending on their reference point, this reduction of utility could potentially explain different evaluation of performance by different economic actors and their willingness to make risky decisions.

    Why should you join?

    • translates well-known theories of social preferences into dynamic models
    • applies these models to deduce behaviour in supply chains
    • discusses the characteristics of paradigmatic models in BOR


  • BOR B2S2 III: Modelling the impact of COVID-19 on the health system capacity in Latin America

    Kathya Cordova-Pozo (presenting author) (Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9108, 6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands), Hubert Korzilius (presenting author), (Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9108, 6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands), Etiënne Rouwette, (Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9108, 6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands), Gabriela Píriz, (Dirección Técnica de Servicio Médico Integral, Luis Alberto de Herrera 2275, Montevideo 11600, Uruguay), Rolando Herrera-Gutierrez (Centro Integral de Medicina Familiar CIMFA, Caja Nacional de Salud, Villa Galindo, Calle La Merced s/n., Cochabamba, Bolivia; Graciela Cordova-Pozo (Unit of anaesthesiology, Hospital Seton Caja Petrolera de Salud, Km 5 Av. Blanco Galindo, Cochabamba, Bolivia; Department of Pathophysiology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Mayor de San Simón, Av. Aniceto Arce s/n, Cochabamba, Bolivia), Miguel Orozco (Freelance Consultant in Health and Development, Managua, Nicaragua)

    February 10th, 2022

    12 AM to 12.40 PM (UK GMT-1)

    1 PM; to 1.40 PM (CET, Berlin)

    Abstract:

    Similar interventions to stop the spread of COVID-19 led to different outcomes in Latin American countries. This study aimed to capture the multicausality of factors affecting Health System capacity that could help plan a more effective response, considering health as well as social aspects. A facilitated GMB was conducted with experts and validated with extant scientific literature and a survey in wider populations. The results show a similar four-factor structure in three countries that includes public administration, preparedness, information, and collective self-efficacy. Statistical analyses show that these factors are the base for similarities and differences which increase the understanding of the pandemic based on country-specific context and can aid policymaking by including them in future pandemic response models.

    Why should you join?

    • A facilitated modelling approach containing two interesting topics for a behavioural operational research perspective: 1) online use of modelling, 2) the comparison of the model to questionnaire data.
    • Validation of GMB in wider populations.
    • COVID-19 in Latin America and its possible explanations on the different outcomes.
    • Give your opinion about future steps in this research field.